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20130416
20130416
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
if it was placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> do you think the people that are in critical condition, they are okay? >> they are not looking okay. it's not what critical means. so, it's really too early to say. >> how long will it take before this process will be critical within hours? >> a number of patients require repeat operations tomorrow and serial operations over the next couple days. a lot of the injuries are combined. they are combined with soft tissue and vascular. they have to be approached in a different factor. >> how about eardrums? are you seeing shattered eardrums? >> we have seen at least one. it's not uncommon with a blast injury. one of the things on my to-do list for tonight for me and the residents is go back around, it can be hard if people are being rushed to the operating room to get examed, to repeat the exams. >> can you give us more information on the hometown? >> no, i'm sorry, i can't. [ inaudible ] >> can you talk about how many will here? >> i can't tell you a previce number. [ inaudible question ] >> i don't know. >> can you give us an age ra
or placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> do you think that most people are critical at this point? [ inaudible ] it's really too early to say. >> how long will this process continue to be critical? hours? >> the younger patients will require operations tomorrow and serial operations over days. a lot of the injuries are soft tissue and vascular injuries and they have to be approached in kind of step-by-step. >> how about ear drums, are you seeing any shattered ear drums? >> we have seen at least one. for me and the residents to actually go right back around, particularly the people, in the operating room to get a good exam. >> can you give us more information on ages, hometowns? >> no, i'm sorry, i can't, actually. >> can you talk about the amput amputees, how many? >> i can't. i mean, a couple. [ question inaudible ] >> i don't know. there were no pediatric patients. the old evidence person i took care of was 71. >> you're a surgeon but still -- >> i mean, it's just depressing. we see accidents all the time, it's just depressing. >> in the course of your career, have
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)